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Old 20-10-17, 05:03 PM   #1
sinna42
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Default New Lathe

I've been on the lookout for a small lathe for sometime.
I'd always thought something like a Myford ML7 or a Boxford would be ideal.

I got a notification by email of an auction sale of various items from a school in Dumbarton & that included some nice looking workshop equipment.

Included were 3 Colchester Bantam Mk1 lathes & a few pillar drills.
I think these Bantams are actually far more desirable & more robust than the likes of a Myford.

I was successful in getting 2 of the lathes - 1 for me & 1 for my colleague ! Missed out on the pillar drills though - they went for good money.
I bid on these unseen which can be a bit of a gamble, but this time we've got 2 very nice machines & for a good price too.
The manufacturers protective grease was still evident on the leadscrew & other parts at the tailstock end !
I think they've never done any real work & the screw cutting leadscrew was never used as the handle was locked off with multiple grub screws.
The 4 jaw chucks are also brand new & never been used.

To say the least I'm well chuffed.

Cheers,
Jim

Here are some photos, firstly as it arrived & the others after a clean up :
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Old 20-10-17, 05:48 PM   #2
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Nice bits of kit, well done!

Peter
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Old 20-10-17, 05:50 PM   #3
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Nice, should give you years of good service

Neil.
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Old 21-10-17, 04:48 PM   #4
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very nice, you did well getting them, they are the same model as the one's i learnt on at a mates workshop, great bit of kit.
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Old 26-10-17, 10:42 AM   #5
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The lathes are just the single speed 1HP motor versions so there are 8 spindle speeds 36 to 800.

But they are 3 phase machines & therefore I need to investigate how to run them off my single phase supply in my garage.

There are so many options here & I wonder what others have done.

Options are :
1) Swap the 3 phase motor for a single phase motor - probably not such a good idea as there is also the 3 phase suds pump. Also problems with getting up to speed.
2) Get 3 phase installed in the garage - not feasible as very expensive.
3) Use a static phase converter - not recommended as the capacitors need to be tuned to the motor & other issues too !
4) Use a rotary phase converter - looks to be the most reasonably priced option especially if built by yourself. Commercial units are about 500-600.
5) Use a digital phase converter. Probably the cheapest option but you need to wire the motor directly to the unit. Disadvantages are that you need to wire the lathe controls (fwd/off/rev) direct to the unit as well. Advantages are that you have the option of speed changing.
6) Use a fancy "plug & play" digital phase converter. This type allows the machine to be used without any modification. Disadvantages are high price due to higher rating to cope with high start current requirements.

I'm sure there will have been a thread about this already, so apologies if this is a bit of duplication.

Cheers,
Jim
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Old 26-10-17, 10:50 AM   #6
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If your lathes are three phase then the controls will use a single phase taken internally from the incoming three phase supply so you just need a single three phase converter supplying the incoming supply.

Martin P
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Old 26-10-17, 11:03 AM   #7
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Yes, agreed - that's how they are wired.
The lo-volt work light transformer is powered from 2 phases.

However if you're using the simpler & cheaper 220/240V output inverter drives these MUST be connected directly to the motor they're driving. The motor being wired in delta form.
So that means there's a lot of rewiring to be done to utilise the controls on the lathe.
The suds pump would also need it's own inverter.

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 26-10-17, 11:15 AM   #8
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If you've got the option of 240V Phase to Phase Delta, you could simply use a capacitor to create the third phase, that works well enough if you're not looking for variable speed.

Our drill in the workshop has had that since it came from Holland in the 1970's.

Peter
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Old 26-10-17, 11:25 AM   #9
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Jim



This is what I'm using to run a 2hp Tom Senior Major. It came from "Drives Direct" in Nottingham, and I can't recommend them enough - very knowledgeable and helpful.

Yes, it needs to be wired directly to the motor, but by using the optional wired remote control you get a control panel (including speed control) that you can position anywhere.

I completely removed the motor controls from the TS, and glued neodymium magnets to the back of the remote, so that I can park it wherever it suits me on the machine.

The inverter does lots of useful things, including ramped start and stop, and even has an automatic programme to "tune" the motor for best results.

MP
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Old 26-10-17, 11:38 AM   #10
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Thanks for the replies.

I've spoken to Direct Drives too - agreed they were very helpful.
For their "plug & play" Inverter they quoted me 995, which is as much as the lathe cost !
They've actually stopped selling static & rotary phase converters & now only sell the digital types.

The attraction of both the plug & play inverter & the rotary phase converter is that you can operate a number of machine tools from the same supply.

If you have only one machine then what Martin has done is, for sure, the most cost effective way. With the added versatility Martin has mentioned.
I like the idea of the remote control unit with the magnets !

Cheers,
Jim
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