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Old 27-01-12, 07:10 PM   #11
biggusdannus
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When I said modern I meant made in a factory or the like. A hammer is designed to hit things and even hitting something as hard as itself for it to shatter you would need to hit it with alot more force than a human could ever manage. I have seen an experiment where two hammers were hit together at high speed using pneumatic rams and the only thing that failed was the handles. Dan

As you said better be safe than sorry! And always try and use safety glasses when using a hammer.
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Old 27-01-12, 07:58 PM   #12
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Your information on 'modern' hammers seem at odds with Gedore who manufacture hammers among with other tools. Safety info is taken from there web site.
http://www.gedoretools.com/index.php...iew&page_id=18

SAFETY NOTES FOR HAMMERS
  • Wear safety glasses and safety gloves.
  • Use the hammer only for its intended purpose.
  • Never misuse the hammer as a lever.
  • Before starting work, check that the hammer head is securely attached to the shaft.
  • Select the appropriate type and size of hammer for the work to be carried out.
  • Never hit two hammers together.
  • Never use steel hammers on workpieces harder than 46 HRC. Use suitable plastic-faced hammers for this. If in doubt, the healthier choice is a suitable plastic-faced hammer.
  • Avoid bouncing blows.
  • Use only the work faces of the hammer. Blows with the side face damage the non-hardened hammer eye. This can loosen the grip of the shaft in the hammer head.
  • If a burr forms on the pein or face of the hammer head, this must be immediately removed. Failure to do this can pose a risk of splintering when the hammer is in use.
  • Grip the hammer shaft as far away from the hammer head as possible. This improves the impact effect and avoids vibrations.
  • Do not store hammers with wooden shafts in warm, dry environments. Wood is a natural product. Dry, warm storage conditions cause the shaft to lose moisture and shrink, so that the hammer shaft is no longer a tight fit in the hammer head. Opposite storage conditions also have a negative effect on the wooden shaft. Do not store the wooden shaft in too damp conditions. Too much moisture causes the wooden shaft to swell up and destroys the wooden fibers. This can result in the wooden shaft snapping behind the eye area.
  • Use only approved hammers for work in explosion-hazard areas.
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Old 27-01-12, 08:57 PM   #13
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I too was taught never to bang hammers together. However it was explaind to me thus, 1- any slight lip or ridge in the face caused by misuse may fly off or 2- any unseen flaw in the head [less likely now but you never know] may cause a chunk to fly off. The main danger being to the eyes as hardened steel at speed would make a nice hole in the eyeball !
As to the valves try tapping from top and bottom [not too hard]with two hammers alternately usig plenty of WD 40.
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Old 19-03-12, 09:19 PM   #14
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The knack with freeing off any stuck pin, valve, shaft or whatever, is knowing when to tap, and when to belt it
A series of light taps can end up riveting the thing together, but a heavy blow can push the item, and the thing it's stuck in, straight through the back of a casting.
I've found that listening to the sound something makes when tapped or hit can give a good clue to how much battering something can stand.
As a precaution, whenever you have something a bit delicate, try to 'back it up' with a heavy object ( I'd normally say a big hammer's good, but I think we've done enough on hammers) just keep the backer clear of the thing that's being driven, and giving the best support to the surrounding area. Working to and fro if needs be, applying oil or similar, it all helps.
Another approach to freeing off stuck pins, etc is the coke cola method. It certainly works, who doesn't know someone who's freed off a stuck piston. I've used it for one.
You used to be able to get phosphoric acid ( the rust eating bit in coke )
car restorers used it in the days before blast cabinets, no idea if it's available now.
good luck with the valves
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Old 26-04-13, 02:11 PM   #15
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See mythbusters. Shattering hammer myth busted!
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Old 27-04-13, 04:08 AM   #16
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Beg to differ on this one, 18 or so years ago when removing machinery from a plant at Clayton West, Yorkshire, which pulverised silicon metal, I saw numerous scrap sledge-hammer heads which had seriously large bits missing ( up to half the face ) these been used to smash the larger chunks of silicon metal prior to processing. Those, err, how can I put it? Presenters on Mythbusters were only playing at smashing hammers and should go to Yorkshire for some proper hammer smashing tuition.

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Old 27-04-13, 09:00 AM   #17
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When i first started work in a local garage. I was sitting one day on the bonnet of the garage Land Rover,I was bouncing a 1lb ball pein on the spare tyre, cant remember why (does a 15 year old need a reason?) The handle snapped cleanly under the head & it hit me between the eyes. (Didnt do that again):crazy:
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Old 27-04-13, 09:01 AM   #18
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Glad to see it didn't do any long-term harm........
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Old 27-04-13, 09:07 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by novo View Post
When i first started work in a local garage. I was sitting one day on the bonnet of the garage Land Rover,I was bouncing a 1lb ball pein on the spare tyre, cant remember why (does a 15 year old need a reason?) The handle snapped cleanly under the head & it hit me between the eyes. (Didnt do that again):crazy:
That explains a lot....
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Old 27-04-13, 09:09 AM   #20
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Many years after the previous incident i was working in industry. I had drawn a brand new 4lb ball pein from the stores & was working in a 8ft square sound proof hut. (It's a long story) I hit the job in hand twice & on the third hit i was suddenly left with just a handle & a 4lb head bouncing round the walls.(It missed me) Dont assume a new hammer is perfect.
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