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Old 30-06-17, 12:41 PM   #1
Howard L
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Default Crossley Gas Engine

I have recently acquired a GE1065 Crossley Gas engine and wonder if anyone can answer a couple of queries I have.

The main bearings are lubricated from oil baths and the big-end from an oiler via a throw ring on the crankshaft. I'm currently using the same SAE30 oil I use in the cylinder oiler but I wonder if that is appropriate. I'm more used to engines with greasers.

The second query concerns the gas "plumbing". I inherited a butane (I was surprised it wasn't propane) cylinder which was attached directly to the Crossley regulator/mixer via a standard low pressure regulator and gas tap. It runs fine on this arrangement with no suggestion of over-supply of gas, but I can't help wondering if there should be some form of demand regulator in the system or whether the Crossley regulator/mixer performs this function. I've had a look inside and think I can see how it would work as one.

I attach a photo of the engine.

Thanks in anticipation
Howard
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Old 30-06-17, 03:48 PM   #2
mighty thor
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Hi Howard, I also have a 1065g gas, tank cooled engine.
I use a straight sae 30 or 40 grade oil and both work ok.
you need to have a gas demand valve between the gas bottle and the engine., because if you don't have one if the engine stops the gas is still flowing into the engine and may be leaking out. You can flood a gas engine with gas and if you do they can be a swine to get going again.
Crossley supplied gas demand valves with their engines and most were bolted to the engine house wall . most of these were lost when these engine houses were knocked down.
I use a Garretson KN demand valve part number 039-122 this model comes with a manual primer button on the side. These can be bought from firms that convert small air cooled engines from petrol to gas, some times they do come up on EBay, you can also get them direct from the USA. looking on the web they seem to have come down in price.
I use the 6Kg propane bottle and with care will last for two days at a rally.
Hope this is of some help. regards tony

Last edited by mighty thor; 30-06-17 at 03:50 PM.
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Old 01-07-17, 04:46 PM   #3
Howard L
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Thanks Tony. I'll see if I can find a Garretson valve or an equivalent.

Howard
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Old 04-07-17, 06:39 PM   #4
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one here, need to be quick......

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/gas-conver...53.m1438.l2649
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Old 05-07-17, 05:26 PM   #5
Howard L
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Thanks for the info. In fact browsing around the forums I've decided to convert an old 766 regulator as described in http://www.stationary-engine.net/for...tor+conversion. I've made a demand regulator in the past for a model engine so understand the principles. I may even try this though suspect it will not have a high enough gas flow.
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Old 24-07-17, 10:27 AM   #6
blackstoneman
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I run all my O/C engines which have bronze bearings and R/Hornsby IP and AP white metal bearings on straight 140 oil,Castrol D, do not use EP oil which has additives harmful to bronze. I have used straight 140 since 1976 and have had no trouble,got this advice at the time from Cliff Noble/Colin Strong who ran their large Tangye and smaller engines on this oil,and I believe they also ran their very large Gardner on 140,their experience went back to the 1960s,I had a 1060 and a 1075 years ago and once the bearings were scraped in and adjusted I never touched them again. I find Gardner nos 0 and 1 which have small white metal bearings run better on semi synthetic 10-40. Used about 7 gallons in 41 years! As you have only recently acquired the engine,I would suggest the the crank is lifted out and the bearings removed,so that the oil pockets can be thoroughly cleaned,Also the oiler ring and the drilled hole taking the oil from the ring to the centre of the big end bearing should be cleaned,dirt in these passages will starve the bearing of oil.
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Old 24-07-17, 10:30 AM   #7
listerdiesel
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We use 30 grade detergent oil in both of our Rustons, I'd have thought that 140 was a bit heavy for a small ring-oiled bearing.

Peter
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Old 26-07-17, 09:31 AM   #8
Howard L
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Thanks to both for the advice. I shall seek a consensus at the next rally although in view of the above I suspect the choice may not be too critical.
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