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Old 22-10-16, 09:13 AM   #41
kevjankie
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Its been a while but the engine is now starting to go back together.

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Old 22-10-16, 09:30 AM   #42
martinpaff
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That looks very nice indeed - does you credit. Of course, that drain tap will have to go...

You still have the excitement of installing transfers; I found doing the hopper was easier with it laying horizontally.

MP
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Old 22-10-16, 10:50 AM   #43
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Its looking good, did you find out who it was supplied to?
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Old 25-10-16, 10:49 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevjankie View Post
Need a bit more advice, I am trying to get the brass valve plugs out , I have managed to get one of them out with a fight but the other one wont budge, I have tried a bit of heat on it but not to sure on how much? being cast and brass together, any help would be very much appreciated
Is it the general consensus on the forum that the best method to remove these plugs is with an air impact driver and a suitable square section bit at the business end. I would like to carry out a top end rebuild on my 'A' next spring. It would seem that some use a 1" square bar and some stilly's whilst other use use the impact wrench already mentioned. Having seen the state of some of the square bars and wrenches on this forum after removal it would seem that some plugs are in bl**dy tight. Some people seem to be lucky getting them out and others not. On my lump there is a broken valve spring, it is said that replacement can be carried out without disassembly. In spite of that I still would like to strip down in order to inspect the valves and guides. It would be interesting to know which is the best method of plug removal, Shock or awe!

graham
P.S That is a very presentable 'A'

Last edited by Cycloid; 25-10-16 at 04:15 PM.
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Old 25-10-16, 01:04 PM   #45
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There is a fantastic tool to help with this situation. Snap On and others sell a heat induction device with coil adaptors. You can shape the loops to fit round odd castings. The advantage is in safety ( no naked flames) and even heating of the working area. I used to have one in my garage for work on light alloy castings, cylinder heads and exhuast manifolds. They are reasonably expensive but safe. Search for heating induction tools for more information.
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Old 25-10-16, 04:22 PM   #46
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James, That looks like a serious bit of kit! I must profess to have never come across such a device before. The drawback for me would be the cost, you would need to get some use out of such a tool at that price.

Last edited by Cycloid; 25-10-16 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 25-10-16, 04:40 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cycloid View Post
Is it the general consensus on the forum that the best method to remove these plugs is with an air impact driver and a suitable square section bit at the business end. I would like to carry out a top end rebuild on my 'A' next spring. It would seem that some use a 1" square bar and some stilly's whilst other use use the impact wrench already mentioned. Having seen the state of some of the square bars and wrenches on this forum after removal it would seem that some plugs are in bl**dy tight. Some people seem to be lucky getting them out and others not. On my lump there is a broken valve spring, it is said that replacement can be carried out without disassembly. In spite of that I still would like to strip down in order to inspect the valves and guides. It would be interesting to know which is the best method of plug removal, Shock or awe!

graham
P.S That is a very presentable 'A'
I would vote for shock every time. Brute force with a long pole is more likely to break something, and you have the added problem of anchoring the engine down whilst you swing on the pole.

If you don't plan to rebuild until next spring you have the best thing on your side - time! Spray the bungs regularly with penetrating oil (search the forum for the best stuff, WD40 is crap for this job), the best I have found is Millars Graphited penetrating oil. Warm the plugs up with a gas torch if you have it lit in the workshop for another task and let them cool. When the time comes to apply the impact wrench (no reason why an impact driver with an adaptor to suit the 1" square shouldn't work) all the above should make the job easier.

Regards,
Dan
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Old 25-10-16, 06:09 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danthetangye View Post
I would vote for shock every time. Brute force with a long pole is more likely to break something, and you have the added problem of anchoring the engine down whilst you swing on the pole.

If you don't plan to rebuild until next spring you have the best thing on your side - time! Spray the bungs regularly with penetrating oil (search the forum for the best stuff, WD40 is crap for this job), the best I have found is Millars Graphited penetrating oil. Warm the plugs up with a gas torch if you have it lit in the workshop for another task and let them cool. When the time comes to apply the impact wrench (no reason why an impact driver with an adaptor to suit the 1" square shouldn't work) all the above should make the job easier.

Regards,
Dan
I subscribe to the penetrating oil idea 100% Dan! Just an idea I had, how about pouring oil into the hopper and leaving it to soak? A lathe slide way oil maybe, I suppose it's a tad messy but do you think that could be more effective than the spray 'penny' oil?
graham
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Old 25-10-16, 09:04 PM   #49
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Quote:
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I subscribe to the penetrating oil idea 100% Dan! Just an idea I had, how about pouring oil into the hopper and leaving it to soak? A lathe slide way oil maybe, I suppose it's a tad messy but do you think that could be more effective than the spray 'penny' oil?
graham
You need a low viscosity unguent. If you are going to fill the hopper I would suggest paraffin or diesel.

Dan
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Old 25-10-16, 10:20 PM   #50
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You need a low viscosity unguent. If you are going to fill the hopper I would suggest paraffin or diesel.

Dan
'Unguent' : a salve or ointment used for healing wounds or sores
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