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Old 08-09-14, 03:18 PM   #11
Paul_Sterling
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Originally Posted by martinpaff View Post
It's worth 75 max - give him my details!



MP
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Nah, I reckon 80, so give him mine instead!

at that rate, your both waiting behind me lol


Actually for the purposes of valuing the engine, I'm staying neutral.

I do like my Crossley, the PH1065 I have is well mannered, and although I think there is still some improvements to make to the running (I've seen others running better), its a lovely engine, I just need to locate its occasional knocking noise. weight wise, its less work than Rob's 6AP was to move around, and it looks light owing to its slender build, but the way it made the single axle trailer sag makes me think its a heavy lump, certainly heavier than the Nelson, which is a similar size.

This G1075 is tank cooled, and the long trolley, large cast wheels, and much less cluttered head gives it a very nice appearance, more in line with the earlier Crossley Gas engines, and of course, its very well finished too

I was thinking along similar lines to Martin and Philip at 1200, I've seen people ask more, a hell of a lot more, but I seriously doubt whether the engines have sold at those loft prices. we all obviously know roughly what I paid for the 1065, but I still cannot quite figure out how that happened.

Martin,
I've got another project (not this engine) to raise some funds for, so I am giving serious consideration to selling those large cast wheels I have, so drop me a PM if you want first shout, I'll dig some pics up regardless.

cheers
Paul.
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Old 08-09-14, 03:27 PM   #12
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I agree, I think the square hopper spoils the look of the twin shaft Crossleys, I'd have a tank cooled one any day. Strange you don't see many tank cooled ones for sale.
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Old 08-09-14, 04:36 PM   #13
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I agree, I think the square hopper spoils the look of the twin shaft Crossleys, I'd have a tank cooled one any day. Strange you don't see many tank cooled ones for sale.
I think virtue of their intended market (industrial predominantly, rather than agricultural) lends itself to Hopper cooling rather than tank cooling, so I think more hopper engines were built.

I like them both! its a nice alternative to the Ruston AP/IP/OK range which is a little more common, and the twin side-shaft arrangement is very different and completely over the top, makes an interesting contrast to simple, single pushrod engines of the time (like the Ruston CPR for example) which were built to keep costs down to remain competitive.

by virtue of no one stepping up to say they have a G1075 in their shed and know someone who has three, I guess they were relatively uncommon and there are not many about?

Paul.
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Old 08-09-14, 06:02 PM   #14
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I've often heard it said that Crossleys (in general) were not made in the vast numbers that other manufacturers managed. They're not "rare" but they are certainly not as common as the likes of a R&H AP.

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I've been offered a G1065, but the owner is looking for a serious amount of money, well north of Martin's suggested 1200 ........ but less than 2 grand. I'm still thinking about it !

Phillip
I guess we all know owners who are a little imaginative about the value of their toys (i.e. living in fantasy land!) and any engine is eventually worth what the buyer will pay. I can't see the Crossley being worth much more than 1200, and I know of a decent 1065 that struggled to sell at less than that.

With the eyes of a buyer, I would want a tank cooled 1075, and wouldn't pay more than that for a good one. I would also be cautious of an engine that has stood in a barn for a number of years with the valves stuck open; it could easily have a rusty bore...

MP
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Old 08-09-14, 06:46 PM   #15
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I agree with most of the above. If the owner wants it to be worth 2k it needs some work, get it out, clean it up, free off the valves and check everything, get it running. On a good day at auction or on ebay in immaculate condition and running well it may well fetch that. As it sits then 1200 is a reasonable asking price.

Other factors that will affect it are the location, engines are worth more in the Midlands, and the physical size of it.

Dan
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Old 08-09-14, 06:48 PM   #16
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I think virtue of their intended market (industrial predominantly, rather than agricultural) lends itself to Hopper cooling rather than tank cooling, so I think more hopper engines were built.


Paul.
I would say that a tank cooled engine is much more likely to be found in an industrial (or permanent) setting. The Hopper cooled engines were intended to be portable and for shorter periods of running.

Dan
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Old 08-09-14, 09:59 PM   #17
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I would say that a tank cooled engine is much more likely to be found in an industrial (or permanent) setting. The Hopper cooled engines were intended to be portable and for shorter periods of running.

Dan
good point Dan, although i was thinking of the crossley engines in general of that type being for the industrial market, as the virtue of the design doesnt lend itself to low cost build, or at least not compared to the other agricultural targeted engines.

Paul.
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Old 09-09-14, 09:15 AM   #18
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On the subject of "massive" cast wheels, on my current "travels" ( bet nobody noticed that I was AWOL??) I have come across 2 sets of super wheels, the "owner" of which was considering sending to the scrap man!!! No measuring device close at hand, but they are around 26" diameter and at least 4.5" wide, 5 spokes and no cracks evident. Currently supporting a pair of Cricket "screens" at a rather posh club somewhere in "Middle England"!!! I'm afraid that I've made the terrible mistake of telling Him that they are worth considerably more than scrap value, but I have asked that I have first option on them, and We are loosely "related"!! His Daughter is married to my Step-Son. I do have photo's but am away from my PC at the moment.
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Old 09-09-14, 09:53 AM   #19
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On the subject of "massive" cast wheels, on my current "travels" ( bet nobody noticed that I was AWOL??) I have come across 2 sets of super wheels, the "owner" of which was considering sending to the scrap man!!! No measuring device close at hand, but they are around 26" diameter and at least 4.5" wide, 5 spokes and no cracks evident. Currently supporting a pair of Cricket "screens" at a rather posh club somewhere in "Middle England"!!! I'm afraid that I've made the terrible mistake of telling Him that they are worth considerably more than scrap value, but I have asked that I have first option on them, and We are loosely "related"!! His Daughter is married to my Step-Son. I do have photo's but am away from my PC at the moment.
nice one Charles,

my wheels are 32" for the rear pair, and either 24 or 26" on the front pair, 3.5" wide.

cheers.
Paul.
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Old 09-09-14, 11:35 AM   #20
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I'm afraid that I've made the terrible mistake of telling Him that they are worth considerably more than scrap value.
That could be fatal
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