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Old 07-09-16, 08:24 AM   #1
Paul_Sterling
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Default Ruston 1HR Trolley

okay so not so much a restoration, but more a thread to document the new trolley.

Our 1HR has been a double edged sword to rally for the past 2 and a bit years, it runs beautifully, looks fab, but is soooo difficult to move around. We feel the maneuverability or lack of it, is down to two/three things, the front wheels are a little skinny for a nose heavy engine, the steering has no articulation, so on uneven ground it tries to three wheel its way over lumps and bumps, and lastly, the trolley is far too heavy.

it looks like the trolley is a simple 4x2 channel arrangement, but in fact it also has a 1/2" thick by 17" wide plate running the length of the trolley, adding a huge weight to the arrangement.

So we've decided to build a wood trolley for it. this has been ongoing for a while, and the woodwork is all but complete.



we've increased the length of the trolley over the original so thatg= the rear wheels are not under the flywheels, which tends to make the engine look like its sitting down onto them.


This is beech again, and I'm pretty happy with the colour it has come out, as I was looking for an intermediate-dark trolley this time.


two piece crossmember, to give strength and surface area for the cast crankcase of the Ruston to settle on.


I am experimenting in making some more traditional looking axle mountings this time.

Something I have found, with the articulated trolleys I have built, is that the spindle axle at one end does not look right with a wooden beam at the rear, in so much as the rear wooden beam looks very substantial and rubust, whereas a round steel bar at the front, as it looks so much smaller, just doesn't look aesthetically balanced.

As the trolleys have all proven to be easy to handle, and stable, I wish to retain the articulated steering beam on the next trolleys, but produce an arrangement that is both functional and looks more period. So this time I am trying spindle at both ends, which has also reduced the amount of wood required, and steel is easier to get hold of than hardwood for me.


So i hope to fabricate these parts into a drop leg, and then make it appear "cast" in looks.

Paul.
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Old 07-09-16, 08:58 AM   #2
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Paul:

The crankcase is stiff enough to support itself over the trolley, you just need to provide a perimeter support area, sides and ends, the centre is open anyway.

Peter
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Old 07-09-16, 10:29 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by listerdiesel View Post
Paul:

The crankcase is stiff enough to support itself over the trolley, you just need to provide a perimeter support area, sides and ends, the centre is open anyway.

Peter
Hi Peter,

yes I get that, and the rear crossmember is also where the engine bolts through, so it needs to be sufficiently strong in order to act as a mount. the other two will be going through the side members of the Chassis.

I think with the current steel trolley, the builder has gone for a symmetrical arrangement, so that the distance from the trolley to the flywheels is equal on both sides, but as one side of the engine has to accommodate the sideshaft assembly, the engine has a side to side difference of about 4", so rather than build the trolley 13.5" wide to suit the engine, the builder made the trolley 17.5" wide and bridged the gap with a 17" wide steel plate and a wooden sandwich piece to mount the engine to. This could have been dispensed with by use of appropriately positioned cross members, and a perimeter-only wood spacer, or even the centre of the 1/2" plate hollowed out, but that is with the benefit of hindsight and a Milling Machine.

With the new trolley, I am dispensing with the symmetry of the distance to flywheels, I'm going with a trolley to support the engine along, so 13.5" wide, and then go with the principle of the rally viewer/general public, will mostly see the engine side on, and won't notice the asymmetrical position of the engine, its an issue many Petter 2 stroke owners have to put up with (the Calibrater fitted M's and most of the smaller S types have a substantial offset on the flywheels in relation to the crank case).

Paul.
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Old 11-09-16, 01:05 PM   #4
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Hi Chaps,

Next set of pictures, i've attached them as opposed to my usual upload as the computer refuses to play ball.

The steel has now been cut to shape, and the ends radiused to 3/8".

I welded the plates up yesterday, they come out ok, I will remove the slight bend the welding has created, and then drill the holes required, before welding the remaining parts on. As this is hopefully going to Barnard Castle, and I'm away with my wife next weekend, i'll have to get my skates on during the week!

Paul.
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Old 24-09-16, 08:08 PM   #5
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the first plate's welding was a little tatty, but I refined the settings for the second set and it went much better, the both fit under the 3/8" radius gauge, so should give no trouble when covered with filler to appear cast.



The bottom faces have now been milled, there has been a slight shift in the ribs when welding, and I had envisaged milling the edge square anyway, in order to help keep everything square when welding as per below;





The final set of holes have now been added.


a lump of 304 stainless dia 30mm, this is for the washers.


bottom plates drilled, and slotted slightly, to allow for variation in the U bolts. A satisfactory sized stainless U bolt could not be found, so we decided to make our own.


Bottom plate welded on.


and underside support.



I'm really happy with how these have turned out, on subsequent ones I may add a closing-in rib on the back, underneath, between the horizontal support and the rear vertical face of the leg having since seen some Lister Trolley drop legs which had these, and it certainly looks the part.

Now I can concentrate on making the front axle.

Paul.
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Old 27-09-16, 10:53 AM   #6
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Work has started on the front axle.

Now that I have the critical dimension, that is the height from the underside face of the drop legs (i.e. the top face of the axle spindle) to the underside of the wood, namely 95mm, I can now start to dimension the position of the pivot point for the axle.

first thing is to make the vertical axis pivot. I have stuck by 25mm dia EN1 or EN3 for this pivot for virtually all my trolleys. This spindle goes through the front axle cradle, and is then attached to a piece of 90mm round x 15mm thick steel, I have welded these two together and will do the final skim to make sure the load bearing surface is 90 degrees to the spindle axis.

Pics to follow.

Next step is to make the three parts of the horizontal pivot. Hitherto I have simply put two 10mm thick flat drop plates down to a bolt through some square EN32 on top of the axle (as per picture below nest to spray tin)



This time I'm trying something different in an attempt to make something more authentic looking.

The pivot will consist of 50mm dia round x 20mm long bar, with a flat face milled 10mm into it, two of these will be welded onto the 90mm disc, to create the top female mounts, with a 12mm dia hole offset through each. The male part, which is the axle half of the pivot, is a 35mm dia round x 35mm long, with a 12mm dia hole through slightly offset towards its top edge, the offset in each of these parts is to give clearance where the vertical spindle goes through the 90mm disc and is welded.

Paul.
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Old 27-09-16, 11:20 AM   #7
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When we built a batch of engine trolleys we used an M30 bolt as the pivot pin, and 8mm thick discs for the swivel. I think we have two sets left out of the original five we built, but they worked pretty well.

The two Ruston trolleys used a set each.

Peter
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Old 04-10-16, 05:19 PM   #8
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some more progress.


Machining the centre pivot bearing surface perpendicular to the axis of the pin.


Holes in the drop legs slotted (some more) for the U-bolts.

Paul.
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Old 06-10-16, 07:54 AM   #9
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A little more progress yesterday. The two bosses for the centre pivot have been skimmed and 5mm milled off to create a flat on one side. next will be to offset drill a 12mm hole through it and part off two 25mm sections, after welding, that will complete the metalworking side of the centre pivot.




this is just an offcut to demonstrate the arrangement.



Paul.
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Old 08-10-16, 11:12 PM   #10
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some more progress today (and I have put pictures onto previous posts that i've only just uploaded).


drop leg clamped to the trolley frame. The top edge is slightly off parallel, but I'm not too worried, and it won't be noticeable when finished.


Drilling the first holes, and blowing sawdust out. These compressed air tins are most useful, but by god they are expensive for what they are!


Long series M12 tap in use


I decided to have the dome heads outward facing, so the two forewardmost bolts were changed to feature dome nuts.

A little insomnia meant I ventured down to the basement to do a little work on the Ruston Trolley.


Right hand side bolted up.


Left side going on.


Quick shot with the wheels somewhere near in place.............. And a non-standard axle material

hope this is of interest.

Paul.
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