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Old 18-05-18, 03:53 PM   #11
nickh
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Yes, they should sort of hook over - I've used them before and not enjoyed the experience, hence question on diamond dressers.

NHH
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Old 18-05-18, 04:25 PM   #12
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I just use a diamond dresser with an adjustable collar against the free edge of the tool rest, safer all round.
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Old 18-05-18, 09:53 PM   #13
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I use a black Silicon dressing block, I have used a star wheel, but found them much too big and aggressive for small bench grinders.
I have a bench grinder, which I don't use, as I find them under powered much of the time.
I dropped one of my grinders and destroyed a nice big carbide wheel, (don't ask), so I made this up instead.
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Old 18-05-18, 09:56 PM   #14
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One place I worked we fitted a keyswitch on the grinder to stop unauthorised users after we caught folks grinding aluminium, perspex and even wood

Stuart.
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Old 18-05-18, 10:02 PM   #15
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I used to use a very large grinder when I used to run single spindle automatic lathes, I have also seen people using a micrometer as a G-clamp.
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Old 18-05-18, 10:14 PM   #16
Lister M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_Sterling View Post
Hi Nick,

Dressing not required if the wheel runs true.

Paul.
Sadly I disagree with above as regardless of wheel running true, which is unlikely on first fitment . you should dress the wheel to not only true it up but you also need to break up the surface to unblock the pores of the wheel face which not only get clogged from use but are clogged during manufacture.
Before you fitted the wheel did you ring tap it to see if it rang, if it didn't ring then bin it as it would be cracked and did you stand aside when you spun it up just in case it flew apart.
I use a single point diamond dresser and depending how fast you pull it across the face you can have a course or fine cut depending on what you need to do with the wheel.

Martin P
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Old 18-05-18, 10:18 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lister M View Post
(snip) Before you fitted the wheel did you ring tap it to see if it rang, if it didn't ring then bin it as it would be cracked and did you stand aside when you spun it up just in case it flew apart.
Yes and yes - I recalled the former from some dim, distant workshop training and the latter is simple self-preservation.

NHH
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Old 18-05-18, 11:09 PM   #18
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I must have changed dozens of wheels over the years, in garages, quarry workshops and at home, and have never done any of these tasks you speak of simply because I didn't know about them and never encountered anyone else working there who did either? You learn something new every day! We certainly didn't have stone dressers at any of those places, just unbolted one wheel, bolted the new one on and ground away happily! My own bench grinder is pretty pathetic really, no power and stops with very little pressure so isn't used a lot.

Pete.
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Old 19-05-18, 07:20 AM   #19
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We where trained as apprentices in heavy engineering and get a certificate to change grinding wheels/discs and ring them and true them up with star dresser or diamond stick it was required by law at one time due to the risks but is not required at home I think.
Dave
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Old 19-05-18, 09:08 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by old-iron View Post
We where trained as apprentices in heavy engineering and get a certificate to change grinding wheels/discs and ring them and true them up with star dresser or diamond stick it was required by law at one time due to the risks but is not required at home I think.
Dave
Old Iron,

That's exactly how I was trained and somewhere my certificate still exists, as far as I'm aware it is still a legal requirement and regardless of work or home I dont take risks with grinding wheels, there is one other thing, do not buy old stock grinding wheels they break down over time.

Martin P
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