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Old 30-07-18, 01:37 PM   #1
Georgineer
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Default Does wax polish work well on bright metal?

I volunteer in the Gas Engine House at Portsmouth's Beam Engine Museum and we have large amounts of brightwork in iron, copper and brass.

At present we spend a lot of time and effort keeping it bright. In the winter months it's an impossible job because everything runs with condensation. I've been wondering whether occasional applications of a wax polish such as Briwax would hep to keep things shiny. I'm wary of finishes such as lacquer or varnish on brass and copper because of the high standard of preparation needed and the awful appearance if you don't get it right. It would be nice too if we didn't have to oil the ironwork quite so liberally to prevent the rust from reappearing overnight.

Has anybody any experience of the wax polish approach, or suggestions for a better one?

George
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Old 30-07-18, 01:40 PM   #2
PuttPuttBang
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Can't hurt to try it on a small inconspicuous area George, Briwax is natural beeswax, isn't it ? I am considering leaving my brasswork covered in it's oily film this winter to see if that reduces the need to polish come Spring time.
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Old 30-07-18, 01:43 PM   #3
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I've used car wax polish on the chromework on my motorcycles for years, may be worth trying?.

Stuart.
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Old 30-07-18, 01:47 PM   #4
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Might be worth trying 50:50 White Spirit and Linseed oil, worked thoroughly into the metalwork.

For bright metal surfaces, I grease them and cover with clingfilm for the winter.

Paul.
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Old 30-07-18, 01:55 PM   #5
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You may be shocked but hairspray is commonly used as well... doesn't add layers of gunk to your machinery and stands the test of time for machinery not in use... and its cheap - you just look odd going into your local shop and buying all their stock...

Honestly - I got this tip from an old engine man and have been using it ever since - well over 20 years and it does the job wonderfully!

Best

Hamish
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Old 30-07-18, 06:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cameltank View Post
You may be shocked but hairspray is commonly used as well... doesn't add layers of gunk to your machinery and stands the test of time for machinery not in use... and its cheap - you just look odd going into your local shop and buying all their stock...

Honestly - I got this tip from an old engine man and have been using it ever since - well over 20 years and it does the job wonderfully!

Best

Hamish
Hairspray is only lacquer. Probably cheaper just to buy the proper stuff - I use Aerosol Satin Lacquer (sometimes called clear-coat) on bright iron on upcycled furniture and it works well. Virtually impossible to remove without a lot of effort once coated though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgineer View Post

Has anybody any experience of the wax polish approach, or suggestions for a better one?

George


Quote:
Originally Posted by PuttPuttBang View Post
Can't hurt to try it on a small inconspicuous area George, Briwax is natural beeswax, isn't it ? I am considering leaving my brasswork covered in it's oily film this winter to see if that reduces the need to polish come Spring time.
We tried beeswax on a pair of bright Tangye Flywheel rims about 15yrs ago. Wasn't particularly effective and I'm still trying to get rid of it!

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Might be worth trying 50:50 White Spirit and Linseed oil, worked thoroughly into the metalwork.

For bright metal surfaces, I grease them and cover with clingfilm for the winter.

Paul.
As per above, there's no substitute for elbow grease, and whatever you apply (ENSIS is the Military Standard Surface Protectant) will take a similar amount of effort to remove.

A good spray with Duck Oil is usually good, as it is designed to do exactly the job you have in mind.

Dan
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Old 30-07-18, 09:26 PM   #7
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I find a wipe with any oily rag does the job for bright work and paint when I show my engines is enough.

Martin P
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Old 20-08-18, 10:44 AM   #8
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Quote "Hairspray is only lacquer. Probably cheaper just to buy the proper stuff - I use Aerosol Satin Lacquer (sometimes called clear-coat) on bright iron on upcycled furniture and it works well. Virtually impossible to remove without a lot of effort once coated though." End Quote

I agree - it is lacquer of sorts - but is extremely easy to remove with an oily rag a minute or so before wanting to use said equipment unlike the proper stuff...which is why I use and recommend it.

it protects all that elbow grease you've just expended!

best

Hamish
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