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Old 11-09-17, 03:50 PM   #1
Garak
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Default Welding Cast Iron

I was hoping that this broken cast iron corn grinder leg could be welded.

The other three legs are OK and even with the break the grinder seems quite stable. I know it could never be as strong as it was before the break.

What do the welding experts here think? or would it be easier to plate it up from behind and secure with some bolts?

Here is the problem:

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Old 11-09-17, 04:30 PM   #2
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Plate and bolt would be my choice,it's what would have happened in its working life unless the farm would have been lucky enough to have a blacksmith.
Use coachbolts and square nuts and a bit of angleiron dipped in brick acid to age them,but wash it off afterwards and dont have anyother bare metal around while the lid's of the brick acid.

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Phil
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Old 11-09-17, 04:56 PM   #3
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I like welding, but as I'm just about to try welding cast iron for the first time i'm not the one to ask for advice.
Considering the placement of the three domed bolts already there I'd be inclined to add a piece of angle iron from behind and a 4th bolt, spent some time making sure the angle is shaped to fit accurately with the cast section will make sure the repair is stable.

Neil.
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Old 11-09-17, 05:14 PM   #4
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It can be welded and it can be as strong as new, but it's a specialized job and not cheap. I have used a company called Cast Iron Welding from Corby. The item is heated to 500C then welded with new cast and peened as it cools.

I'm afraid that for this job it's unlikely that you would justify the cost - plate and bolt it!

MP
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Old 11-09-17, 05:58 PM   #5
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There you go Martin, concencus seems to be do a 'farmyard repair' like I suggested when you phoned earlier! Looks an ideal spot for a bolt and plate job and wont look out of place at all. Now go ahead and get it bought!!

Pete.
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Old 11-09-17, 06:21 PM   #6
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It's not going to be the highest quality cast iron, so get a nice bit of weathered plate and use that with some old bolts. It'll add character.

Dazzla
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Old 11-09-17, 07:09 PM   #7
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Thanks to all who replied, all with sensible advice.

A bolted repair it is then.

Thanks

Martyn
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Old 11-09-17, 10:20 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garak View Post
Thanks to all who replied, all with sensible advice.

A bolted repair it is then.

Thanks

Martyn
Once bolted securely together, if the crack bothers you filling with weld should be easy enough, even mig welded with normal steel wire will do the job.

Neil.
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Old 12-09-17, 09:06 AM   #9
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I welded a root cutter frame using nickle rods no pre heating, should be ok but plate reinforcment behind wouldnt go amiss on a leg.
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Old 12-09-17, 11:16 AM   #10
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No real expense needed just to weld - using plenty of pre heat - its a time consuming job more than expensive - I've successfully repaired cracked spokes on old trolley wheels before and a similar leg issue for a B.E.N compressor - all using my oxy acetylene set.

However have a read of the following link which explains it in better technical detail and advice - and if you don't have the kit then a good character building farm repair will do nicely too!

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...on-detail.aspx

Welding cast iron is a great skill to have under your belt - practice on some scrap if you have it (or buy some old broken cast iron kit of fleabay for a couple of quid - old stoves worked for me and a broken one can cost as little as the .99p starting price...

best

Hamish
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