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Old 13-09-17, 08:52 AM   #11
gaudin98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cameltank View Post
No real expense needed just to weld - using plenty of pre heat - its a time consuming job more than expensive - I've successfully repaired cracked spokes on old trolley wheels before and a similar leg issue for a B.E.N compressor - all using my oxy acetylene set.

However have a read of the following link which explains it in better technical detail and advice - and if you don't have the kit then a good character building farm repair will do nicely too!

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...on-detail.aspx

Welding cast iron is a great skill to have under your belt - practice on some scrap if you have it (or buy some old broken cast iron kit of fleabay for a couple of quid - old stoves worked for me and a broken one can cost as little as the .99p starting price...

best

Hamish
Worn out car brake discs are cheap to practice on.
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Old 13-09-17, 08:18 PM   #12
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just a quick one, cast iron rod are very expensive, you could use dissimilar rods, they will weld most ferrous metals but again they are very expensive, some cast will weld very well, some are awful, depends on the original make up, pre heat is the secret and let it cool real slowly, you could "stop,start" without pre heating this will work but will take quite a long time, it is not like welding mild steel,if you weld it without heat or stop,start it will crack along side of the weld, it's worth a go if you can get some rods, you may be surprised how many you need?
just an opinion(with 40 years experience)
cheers
neil
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Old 13-09-17, 08:51 PM   #13
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Weldequip does small packs of dissimilar rods - link

Stuart.
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Old 13-09-17, 09:38 PM   #14
Hornet 6
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I had my first go at welding cast iron today.
I started by stick welding with proper cast rods, DCEP and short runs, peening with a needle scaler as I went, after a couple of false starts it went ok, got the ground out crank welded and filled ok, took an hour or so with plenty of cooling time, block never got hotter than running temp.
However I could not for the life of me build the surface up with the cast rods.
I ended up finishing off with the mig welder, using stainless 308L wire and pure argon, worked a treat

Neil.
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Old 13-09-17, 09:39 PM   #15
chrismac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gigglepin View Post
just a quick one, cast iron rod are very expensive, you could use dissimilar rods, they will weld most ferrous metals but again they are very expensive, some cast will weld very well, some are awful, depends on the original make up, pre heat is the secret and let it cool real slowly, you could "stop,start" without pre heating this will work but will take quite a long time, it is not like welding mild steel,if you weld it without heat or stop,start it will crack along side of the weld, it's worth a go if you can get some rods, you may be surprised how many you need?
just an opinion(with 40 years experience)
cheers
neil
I have been reading this thread and thought about saying something earlier, you have hit the nail on the head, welding cast iron depends on the cast you are trying to weld, some parts I have done have been a pleasure with a real good job when done, other parts like cast wheels where the cast was not of such good quality I have been chasing cracks to the point I wish I never started,


Chris
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Old 14-09-17, 12:56 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hornet 6 View Post
I had my first go at welding cast iron today.
I started by stick welding with proper cast rods, DCEP and short runs, peening with a needle scaler as I went, after a couple of false starts it went ok, got the ground out crank welded and filled ok, took an hour or so with plenty of cooling time, block never got hotter than running temp.
However I could not for the life of me build the surface up with the cast rods.
I ended up finishing off with the mig welder, using stainless 308L wire and pure argon, worked a treat

Neil.
I vaguely remember something from many years ago about "buttering" with one type of rod, then building up with another??

Stuart.
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