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Old 13-02-18, 02:42 PM   #61
PuttPuttBang
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Originally Posted by wolseley phill View Post
You’ll soon find yourself removing that guard anyway...
Yes none of the YouTube videos I have seen use one, although they all advise some sort of eye protection ? Long sleeves and hair are out as well, apparently.
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1929 Ruston-Hornsby 6 AP, 1925 Ruston-Hornsby 5 IP, 1920s 50V GE dynamo.
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Old 13-02-18, 04:45 PM   #62
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The gaurd looks modified and I would guess that that is because the "missing" part got in the way of the saddle when working close to the chuck
Reading through the posts I have the impression that lathe work is all new to you.
If I can offer some advice,it would be to treat the lathe with respect,they can and do bite resulting in very nasty injuries,ie lost limbs,eyes,fingers and teeth to name but a few
I would put the gaurd back in place and get the cutout rewired so you can only use the lathe with the gaurd down,untill atleast you feel comfortable around the lathe.leaving the chuck key in and starting the lathe up will grab your attention and may result in broken bones,teeth,lightbulbs and windows.
The lathe is a great edition to any workshop but it's not worth getting injured over.take your time to learn the lathe and get comfortable around it,know how to instictivly stop it in an emergency.
And above all enjoy your newfound skills
Regards
Phil
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Old 13-02-18, 04:53 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slatteybarn View Post
The gaurd looks modified and I would guess that that is because the "missing" part got in the way of the saddle when working close to the chuck
Reading through the posts I have the impression that lathe work is all new to you.
If I can offer some advice,it would be to treat the lathe with respect,they can and do bite resulting in very nasty injuries,ie lost limbs,eyes,fingers and teeth to name but a few
I would put the gaurd back in place and get the cutout rewired so you can only use the lathe with the gaurd down,untill atleast you feel comfortable around the lathe.leaving the chuck key in and starting the lathe up will grab your attention and may result in broken bones,teeth,lightbulbs and windows.
The lathe is a great edition to any workshop but it's not worth getting injured over.take your time to learn the lathe and get comfortable around it,know how to instictivly stop it in an emergency.
And above all enjoy your newfound skills
Regards
Phil
Yes, Lathes can and regularly do kill, that is the first thing you notice on google, some professional engineer in Wales killed recently by a workpiece coming loose and breaking his skull, because it was too long for the lathe and not secured properly according to the coroner. They can drag you in as well. Many horror stories out there. Most on here will have done apprenticeships and been trained properly. I have not so must proceed only with great caution.

I can see an evening course at the local tech college would be a good investment. My granddad did a 7 year apprenticeship before he became a toolmaker at Lee Enfield. We still have his indenture documents. Unfortunately he is not around to teach me. He had the tips of two fingers missing, this impressed me as a child.
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Old 13-02-18, 05:10 PM   #64
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Lathe accident on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EdQq5iAGYs
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Old 13-02-18, 05:54 PM   #65
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When I was at Tech an apprentice tried to clean up an internal thread with emery wrapped around his finger, luckily the bore was big enough not to actually twist his finger off!
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Old 13-02-18, 08:03 PM   #66
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When I started college, before anyone was allowed near any machines, we were given several hours lecture on health and safety stuff. The somewhat graphic pictures of various lathe accidents left an impression on us all.

It is well worth keeping a little slack on your drive belt(s) so that in the event of a “crash” you don’t go snapping parting off tools or damaging anything else.

I set mine so that if I lock the spindle, the countershaft pulley can just be slipped by hand.

Phill.
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Old 13-02-18, 08:15 PM   #67
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The only time I used a lathe was during the first year of my apprenticeship, on the first turning exercise I was taking little nibbles of 1mm at a time when the tutor came over and said "what are you playing at lad" while winding on a few mm cut producing great chunks of swarf, once he'd gone I went back to 1mm at a time

Stuart.
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Old 13-02-18, 09:17 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PuttPuttBang View Post
(snip) Most on here will have done apprenticeships and been trained properly.
Just basic school metalwork for me - I think we made a nut and bolt!

NHH
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Old 13-02-18, 10:10 PM   #69
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Just basic school metalwork for me - I think we made a nut and bolt!

NHH
I failed the 11+ so no metalwork for me alas, had to weed the school garden instead. That taught me that I hate gardening!! No night classes around here either, a lathe will not be appearing at Windrush Towers at anytime! Luckily there are a couple of clubmates who are experts if I need anything doing, they do fine work but don't work at cheap rates.

Pete.
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Old 13-02-18, 10:28 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PuttPuttBang View Post
Most on here will have done apprenticeships and been trained properly. I have not so must proceed only with great caution.

I can see an evening course at the local tech college would be a good investment.
I served my time at ICI, one of the best companies of the day in the UK....so consider myself to have a decent grounding and having returned to machining in the last 18 years....
A course at the local tech college would be money well spent, but then there is the level of teaching expertise to consider....if the course is led by someone of junior years...well...ermm I dunno
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