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Old 18-02-18, 07:56 AM   #1
mervyn cloake
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Default Wolseley 1931 pre WD 2 Hp

Back in the 1980's My father restored this engine before he passed away in 1989. It has never been run because it was missing the the needle valve from the carburetor.

Recently I decided to get it running and made a needle valve that worked. But to cut a long story short and after sorting out a few issues that my father got wrong, I actually got it to briefly run.The magneto had a weak spark and needed checking out so it is away for an overhaul.

The question I have is about the crankcase breather. All it is, is a hooded opening and doesn't appear to have any provision for a flap valve or anything else to prevent oil from splashing out. Is this normal?

These engines are not common here in fact I only know of two others but I don't who has them now.

Any help will be welcome here are the photos.

Merv

[IMG]DSCF5047 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]DSCF5045 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]DSCF5044 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old 18-02-18, 03:27 PM   #2
growler1550
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Afternoon Mev
answer to your question, on the pre wd they are only an open ended breather & have no flap
these engines don't take allot of oil & if you over fill them it does throw the oil out of the breather
interested to know what number is this engine - mine is 1333
if you look in my pictures you will see mine there.
i have had trouble with mine dripping fuel out the end of the carb hence you will see a bucket!
i have re cut the needle value in & put extra fibre washers under the float bowl to weaken the mixture, but no matter what i try it still bloody does it!
there is a good write up i n the book Wolseley David Edgington
if you need any help, I am happy for you to give me a call
let me know how you get on
Andy
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Old 19-02-18, 09:31 PM   #3
mervyn cloake
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Thanks for the reply Andy,
My engine's S/n is 1213. I expect the oil level would only be where only the dipper catches it and the rotation of the engine would through the oil away from the breather David does mention in the book that the oil level is important.

As the magneto is away for overhaul I can't run it to find the float level. I assume there is a notch on the needle to hold the float at the correct level. I have fuel runing out of the carburetor too and concluded the float was too high.

I see your engine is not listed in Davids book. I have no doubt there will be more. Looking at the range of serial numbers it would suggest a very low production numbers, possibly as low as five hundred.

Merv.
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Old 31-07-18, 10:25 AM   #4
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Progress has been slow on the pre WD. The mag came back with a spark so it was installed ready for a start up. I had already made a nice hardwood base for it and had mounted the engine on it. It was still on the bench and after some fuel in the tank, a quick crank, and it fired up. I ran it for about a minute before shutting it down.

It was time to get the fork lift out and get it outside for good long run with water in the hopper. This is where the fun started. I could not get it to start again, not that day, or the next or at all over the next week. I checked the fundamentals, all correct. If it started once why wouldn't it go again? I changed the mag and the plug. The problem had to be in the carburetor. Up to now I hadn't taken it apart and what I found puzzled me. The carburetor is a surface type where the fuel is drawn from a nipple , the float controls the fuel level in the bowl. In this case the nipple was well below the fitting that held it causing fuel to pond in it and not vaporize I did know of two others that had been sold and not knowing where there went meant I couldn't have a look at one. I did find out that that early WD's had a similar carb, so with the help from my friend Graham we made a nipple based on the one from the WD. He also made another needle valve.

Now the engine runs, but after a some adjustment with the float I have got it quite good but it will only run with the choke shut and it is still running fast.The nipple hole is the same size as the WD and the same as my petrol 2 1/2 hp Blackstone that has a similar type carburetor so it should be right.

Although it starts easily I can't say that I am happy with it. I don't know just where to go next to be happy with it but I haven't finished with it yet.
I will post photos soon.

Merv.
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Old 31-07-18, 07:08 PM   #5
philipagri
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Just a few thoughts...
My impression, and I am happy to be proved wrong, is that these engines were designed during the Great Depression from the old heavy tank cooled R type as a much lighter and cheaper alternative and with hopper cooling to keep Wolseley in the engine business. Unlike the R type and models before they do not seem so well made. There are indeed very few of them in preservation (although also few R types this side of the world - I am slowly getting mine back together).
It was only with the acquisition of manufacturing rights and improvements to the Ruston PT that led to production of the WD that Wolseley engines really became popular over here with farmers and the like.

Philip
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Old 01-08-18, 10:30 PM   #6
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Philip, you could well be right. Indications are that less than 500 may have been built, so for whatever reason it could not be classed as a successful engine.

I ran it again yesterday I did get it to settle down at 750 RPM by lowering the float a fraction. I do not understand why it will only run with the choke fully closed. A hunt on You Tube reveled only one other and that one appeared to also have the choke closed too.

Here are photos.

Merv.

This photo shows the float bowl assembly The old nipple went in from the bottom and in my opinion two low the new one is fitted in the top. I haven't a photo of it

[IMG]Mervs Carburetor & parts 2 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is as it is now the mag is not the original one but the original will go back on

[IMG]DSCF5139 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old 01-08-18, 10:32 PM   #7
mervyn cloake
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Philip, you could well be right. Indications are that less than 500 may have been built, so for whatever reason it could not be classed as a successful engine.

I ran it again yesterday I did get it to settle down at 750 RPM by lowering the float a fraction. I do not understand why it will only run with the choke fully closed. A hunt on You Tube reveled only one other and that one appeared to also have the choke closed too.

Here are photos.

Merv.

This photo shows the float bowl assembly The old nipple went in from the bottom and in my opinion two low the new one is fitted in the top. I haven't a photo of it

[IMG]Mervs Carburetor & parts 2 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is as it is now the mag is not the original one but the original will go back on

[IMG]DSCF5139 by Merv Cloake, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old 14-08-18, 10:40 PM   #8
antiBRIGGSANDSTRATTON
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One of my wish list engines, lovely looking things, well done Merv!
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Fowler 1PA,Petter W1H,Stuart P4,Villiers WX11, Single flywheel Lister A, 1931 & 1929 Shafty D's,1929 Bruston D,Wolseley WD2,Superbloc 3hp,Conord F2,1943 Fairbanks ZD,Lister Butter Churn,Brackett pump,Maroilles butter churn, D & F twin pump
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Old 15-08-18, 10:57 AM   #9
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Well done Merv,

I wonder it the jetting is too big, requiring a great vacuum from the intake in order to pull the fuel through, and that can only be achieved by closing off the air intake to pull on the fuel more?

I've wondered a similar thing with my 6PB Ruston, as it will not run with the choke open very far until it is running with a substantial load.

Ramblings of a madman.

Paul.
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Old 15-08-18, 10:06 PM   #10
mervyn cloake
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Paul, The trouble is I can't find out what size the nipple should be. The hole is the same size as the WD, and my petrol 2 1/2hp Blackstone has a 72 nipple which is also the same The drill used was a 72 which is a fraction over half a mm. My gut feeling is that it should be larger. The float level is set so that the fuel is level with the nipple. There should be something over the intake but I don't know what or if that would restrict the air flow. We may make another with a slightly larger hole.

Merv
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