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Old 04-09-09, 01:06 PM   #11
stover600
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Hi, i would'nt worry too much. you can do a bit each time you rally the engine with some emery if you wish and it will clean up, personally i like to see some pitting and machine marks as it adds a bit of charm to the engine, but thats just me. Cheers Andy
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Old 03-05-10, 09:50 PM   #12
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Hi
I machine all my flywheels using a expanding mandrel,mounted in the bore,all machining is then true to the bore,even if the flywheel is crowned,i have a an early lister d that is,it is still easy to put the taper back on.
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Old 03-05-10, 09:59 PM   #13
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Go down the sandpaper route, then hold a piece of scotchbrite against it as Martin said, but soak the scotch in brasso, it is a mild abrasive, then polish it off with a cotton cloth.

Or go down the originality route and paint it green!

Don't chrome it or paint it silver, chrome is overkill and paint looks tacky...

Best of luck

Ryan
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Old 03-05-10, 11:27 PM   #14
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I.m close to that scenario with my pb, what i was wondering and i might be shot down for saying this!! but would a 4 1/2" grinder with a 80 or 120 girt soft disc on help while the engines on tickover? i thought that if your grinder rotates clockwise and your flywheels are going anti clockwise then then if light pressure was used then surely the worst could be taken off and then hand finished the usual way.
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Old 04-05-10, 08:04 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Handy Andy View Post
Hi
I machine all my flywheels using a expanding mandrel,mounted in the bore,all machining is then true to the bore,even if the flywheel is crowned,i have a an early lister d that is,it is still easy to put the taper back on.
That sounds similar to the Reekie Flange facing machine i used to use when i work for furmanite, though it sounds like your kit is attached differently, the reekie had the advantage of being able to machine different faces, as well as being able to machine huge pipe faces, ready for re-welding.


Quote:
Originally Posted by janner View Post
I.m close to that scenario with my pb, what i was wondering and i might be shot down for saying this!! but would a 4 1/2" grinder with a 80 or 120 girt soft disc on help while the engines on tickover? i thought that if your grinder rotates clockwise and your flywheels are going anti clockwise then then if light pressure was used then surely the worst could be taken off and then hand finished the usual way.
Its not that bad of an idea, quite dangerous on the rally field like (sparks and projectiles onto spectators), you'd probably find that a drill with a lapper attachment would probably be safer, as a grinder takes no prisoners when it snatches.

I have seen on a couple of occasions on lathes and such like, home made grinder pedestals, designed to pass a grinder over a work piece, using the tool post, but how safe or legitimate the equipment was, i dont know, that said i have also seen file rests for the lathe, even as far as being posted in a model engineer magasine, but this sort of kit would be universally condemned in training schools these days.

as i mentioned above, i used on-site machining equipment when i worked at Furmanite, this ranged from milling beds to pipe faces and reekie pipe cutters, each of which was desinged and made by furmanite, is therefore probable, based on thier equipment, that someone could actually make a flywheel facing machine that the engine attaches to, trouble with this is, by the time you've made such a machine, you may as well have just took the flywheel off and had it skimmed in the lathe! lol.

Paul
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Old 04-05-10, 09:06 AM   #16
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A lot will depend on the flywheel material, cast iron is always fairly coarse-grained, and won't take a shine easily. Some foundries used a finer grain material for things like flywheels, usually a harder grade, but at the end of the day I usually paint my rims a different colour to the main body of the wheel itself.

The Ruston had semi-gloss Black flywheels with blue rims, so that has stayed.

Peter
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Old 04-05-10, 09:56 AM   #17
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Here is my d and i had the flywheel professionally skimmed, the only way to do a good job in my opinion :)
Steve.
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Old 04-05-10, 01:50 PM   #18
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My startomatic had a 2mm wobble on one of the flywheels. I skimmed the sides down on both sides to true it up.

What I did was to use my pillar drill with an adjustable vice (google Clarke CCV5C 5" (125mm) Cross Vice). I clamped my 4 1/2" grinder into the vice and moved the pillar drill to the engine (I really wish I had taken some pictures when I did this). The weight of the pillar drill meant I wasn't going to have much movement.

As the vice is adjustable while holding the grinder I was able to hand turn the flywheel into the grinders wheel while also moving the grinder across the width of the flywheel face.

I mocked up the grinder on the drill so I could take a pic to show an example of the setup -



The vice allowed me to move the grinder side to side as well as in and out - ie, light skim or a full-on grind!!

It took me around 4 hours as I was taking my time - and its a big wheel. The face should be less.

I realise that not everyone has a vice like this, but im sure that you could clamp a grinder to a 4x4 timber and make a tight channel for the 4x4 to slide in to give a similar result.

I would not do this with the engine running as its likely to kick back the grinder if you catch the flywheel wrong. It may do the same with a linishing disc to a lesser degree.

Terry
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Last edited by Tezfair; 04-05-10 at 01:53 PM. Reason: made the picture smaller and embedded it
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Old 04-05-10, 02:29 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezfair View Post
My startomatic had a 2mm wobble on one of the flywheels. I skimmed the sides down on both sides to true it up.

What I did was to use my pillar drill with an adjustable vice (google Clarke CCV5C 5" (125mm) Cross Vice). I clamped my 4 1/2" grinder into the vice and moved the pillar drill to the engine (I really wish I had taken some pictures when I did this). The weight of the pillar drill meant I wasn't going to have much movement.

As the vice is adjustable while holding the grinder I was able to hand turn the flywheel into the grinders wheel while also moving the grinder across the width of the flywheel face.

I mocked up the grinder on the drill so I could take a pic to show an example of the setup -



The vice allowed me to move the grinder side to side as well as in and out - ie, light skim or a full-on grind!!

It took me around 4 hours as I was taking my time - and its a big wheel. The face should be less.

I realise that not everyone has a vice like this, but im sure that you could clamp a grinder to a 4x4 timber and make a tight channel for the 4x4 to slide in to give a similar result.

I would not do this with the engine running as its likely to kick back the grinder if you catch the flywheel wrong. It may do the same with a linishing disc to a lesser degree.

Terry
Sounds interesting Terry, did you rotate the flywheels by hand as the grinder was operating, i ask because you said not to do it with the engine running.

i have a Petter M type with a similar amount of deflection, though i havent yet ascertained if its the flywheel or the crank yet.

Paul
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Old 04-05-10, 07:34 PM   #20
martinpaff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_Sterling View Post
I have seen on a couple of occasions on lathes and such like, home made grinder pedestals, designed to pass a grinder over a work piece, using the tool post, but how safe or legitimate the equipment was, i dont know,
Paul
Hi Paul

It's called a "Tool Post Grinder" and it's a perfectly acceptable machining method. I have the Boxford Little Giant tool post grinder for my Boxford AUD, but to be honest, I made a tool post holder for my Dremel and it works much better.

I re-face valves using this set-up: valve in the mandrel in a collet, tool post grinder set over at 45 degrees, then re-face the valve using very fine "cuts". You end up with a beautifully new, perfectly concentric valve, ready to drop into a newly cut seat, like these:



I've done valves for a few forum members, who've been happy with the results.

Martin.
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