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Old 29-07-17, 02:17 PM   #1
malcolm Tierney
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Dear All,
I bought a Lister D in working order in order to help me with a project.
It conked out and now it has become one. (Damn)
I shall be stripping it down and replaceing the bearings, valves, valve guides, gaskets and then re-setting the timing as well as cleaning etc. At the moment there is no timing mark but with the top of the block off I can put a dial gauge on a magnetic base and find top dead centre so this should not be a problem. My question and please forgive me this is (ahem) what fuel should I be putting in this engine? It is a petrol engine and not a paraffin one. I was using unleaded. The valves are now blowing. I know this as when I last turned it over with my hands above the valve chest I could feel the draught from within. so please forgive my ignorance of this basic question. I am not a stationary engine enthusiast and have not really tinkered with internal combustion engines. Having watched steamwally's videos on youtube I am confident that I can restore this machine to health with some time and new parts but the fuel issue is one so basic that no one seems to mention it. Have I burnt the valves? Should I be adding an additive to the fuel?

Your advice would be welcomed.

Thanking you in advance and blushing a little.

Malcolm Tierney
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Old 29-07-17, 02:29 PM   #2
eddie78
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The Ds do breathe the crankcase pressure through the valve chest the valve cover has 2 cutouts to allow this, as long as there is some compression the D will run, unleaded fuel wouldnt of hurt the engine, timing wise TDC is when the Gib key is pointing down, measure the circumference of the flywheel (can remember of hand the number) divide by 360 and you have a measurement for 1 degree, mine is set at 10 BTDC. but in my limited experience as long there is a spark, fuel, some compression, it will run.

If your valves where burnt/leaking you would hear/feel it breathing on the compression stroke through the carb/exhaust

If the engine was running and then stopped providing there is some compression I would be looking elsewhere before pulling the head, my first call would be check for a spark and check the plug, they can be fussy with spark plugs

They are a basic engineering and as a result they have very basic requirements, when I got mine it barely had compression both valves leaking lots of blow by on piston rings, weak spark, carb issues but she ran not pretty but ran.

first run all she had was a new plug,
https://youtu.be/gOrKkVHoXps

final run before strip down and resto yet again only new parts where sparkplug and gov spring (she gained compression piston rings unstuck by running)
https://youtu.be/5_x5fV7MwuY
after a minor resto only new parts where a gasket set and timing chain, they are a fantastically easy engine to learn and work on from a pile of painted bits to a running engine took 2 hours
https://youtu.be/20bTJiWyZ8M

Last edited by eddie78; 29-07-17 at 02:42 PM.
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Old 29-07-17, 02:39 PM   #3
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I think the D was designed long before lead was added to petrol. I've ran D's on ordinary pump petrol for a long time and don't think I've ever done the valve seats any appreciable harm. You will always have air movement above the rockers on a D, it's caused by the movement of the piston in the cylinder. If Your valve seats were leaking they would leak into the "manifolds", You would hear them hissing if You turned it over by hand.
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Old 29-07-17, 02:44 PM   #4
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Agree with Eddie78 something simple is wrong, fuel blockage, slipped timing, points closed. Waste of time stripping engine.


Martin P
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Old 29-07-17, 02:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulsechoes View Post
I think the D was designed long before lead was added to petrol. I've ran D's on ordinary pump petrol for a long time and don't think I've ever done the valve seats any appreciable harm. You will always have air movement above the rockers on a D, it's caused by the movement of the piston in the cylinder. If Your valve seats were leaking they would leak into the "manifolds", You would hear them hissing if You turned it over by hand.
I thought lead had always been a component of petrol until unleaded was introduced in the 1980's?.

Stuart.
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Old 29-07-17, 02:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robotstar5 View Post
I thought lead had always been a component of petrol until unleaded was introduced in the 1980's?.

Stuart.
Lead was added in the 1920s

I imagine one of the design requirements of the D was to run on any old crap, I think pretty much as long as it burns and is liquid

Last edited by eddie78; 29-07-17 at 02:54 PM.
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Old 29-07-17, 02:54 PM   #7
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Lead was added in the 1920s
So they went full circle then
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Old 29-07-17, 02:56 PM   #8
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So they went full circle then
It main reason for adding the lead was to reduce engine knock and to allow higher compression ratios,
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Old 29-07-17, 02:59 PM   #9
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Google Thomas Midgley and work from there for the full story.

NHH

Last edited by nickh; 29-07-17 at 03:02 PM.
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Old 29-07-17, 03:03 PM   #10
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Google Thomas Midgley and work from there for the full story.

NHH
He was notorious!

Thomas Midgley was a renowned chemist and inventor who held over 100 patents in his lifetime, but hes most notorious for two chemicals which wreaked untold havoc on the environment: leaded gasoline and Freon, the first CFC


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