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Old 08-05-18, 06:27 PM   #1
Mister_D_Lister
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Default Copper fuel pipe bending

I've made fuel pipes before but never with a vibration loop. As I'm about to make a pipe up for my Stuart I'd like to try a loop. My question is - using 1/4" copper tube, what's the minimum diameter former I could expect to bend around without kinking?

It's not a long run between the tank & carb so I don't think the loop is strictly required but they look nice :)

My tube is sold as malleable copper for brake & fuel lines & I've not straightened it out from the coil it arrived in yet.

Paul.
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Old 08-05-18, 06:54 PM   #2
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If it's definitely copper, and not the exotic alloy they use for brake lines, and if it's definitely annealed, then you can form it in your hands without risk of kinking. Form your coil around something like a broom handle (or a little bigger).

Don't mess - your first bend work-hardens the material, and if you fiddle then you are more likely to kink it.

MP
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Old 08-05-18, 07:00 PM   #3
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Smallest I've done was around 1.5 inches ID, just carefully wrap around suitable bar.
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Old 09-05-18, 07:17 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by martinpaff View Post
If it's definitely copper, and not the exotic alloy they use for brake lines, and if it's definitely annealed, then you can form it in your hands without risk of kinking. Form your coil around something like a broom handle (or a little bigger).

Don't mess - your first bend work-hardens the material, and if you fiddle then you are more likely to kink it.

MP
Cheers Martin - guess I'll soon find out if it's malleable copper or not. It's also a use for a dead Villiers coil - a former :)

Paul.
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Old 09-05-18, 07:34 PM   #5
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Copper work hardens quite quickly so if you don't get the bends right first time you may need to re-anneal.

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Old 09-05-18, 08:18 PM   #6
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There's no harm in annealing it before you start bending, and no harm in annealing it again part way through......makes the job easier..
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