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Old 13-07-18, 10:27 AM   #1
ChriX
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Default What water pump?

I've got a practical need where I need to lift water from perhaps 3-4 metres (13 feet) below the pump and push it up to 10 metres (32 feet) above on a semi-regular basis.

I've got a Lister H1 which was doing the job (albeit a bit slowly, could do with a higher flow rate), but it is a nightmare to get it to prime and it leaks like a sieve under pressure. I think it needs all the seats machining so they seal properly and perhaps a new ram too - it worked great for display purposes on the rally field but not so good in a real world scenario.

What pump would be best suited for this? Ideally want to be able to get it running without priming so some suction ability would be useful - I have a foot valve on the bottom but still didn't work that great with the H1.

I thought it would be fun to set up a miniature pumping station installation with a little shed to protect the engine and pump, and do a concrete base etc.

Thanks all
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Old 13-07-18, 12:00 PM   #2
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Water from a pond/well? Is it clean? Is it going to a storage tank or out of a hose?
The Domestic would work, or a Lee Howl, Leo, in fact most piston pumps would be OK. If you are having problems with priming then I expect your foot valve isn't seating or you may need another non return valve elsewhere.
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Old 13-07-18, 02:18 PM   #3
martinpaff
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Don't forget that there is a physical maximum that the pump can draw above the water level, and a foot valve makes no difference. As soon as the water column starts cavitating the pumping will stop. I cant remember what that value is, but I think you may be somewhere near? The solution is a deep well pump or you move your pump down hill closer to the supply.

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Old 13-07-18, 02:50 PM   #4
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Around 28-30 feet dependent on temperature and atmospheric pressure.
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Old 13-07-18, 04:10 PM   #5
martinpaff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ListerHA2 View Post
Around 28-30 feet dependent on temperature and atmospheric pressure.
...and that would probably be reduced by any resistance in the foot valve.

There's absolutely no reason why a healthy H1 should be leaking, so it rather sounds as if it needs some attention. One drip every 3 or 4 strokes would be about right; a slight leak keeps the gland packing lubricated.

I sincerely doubt that any pump is going to self-prime against a 13 feet feed - you are asking it to shift enough air to create a vacuum to lift the weight of water in the feed pipe - can't see it happening!

MP
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Old 13-07-18, 04:28 PM   #6
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A column of water 32 feet or 9.8m high is the absolute maximum as there is effectively a vacuum at that point & no pump can pump less than a vacuum !

Cheers,
Jim
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Old 13-07-18, 06:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by martinpaff View Post
I sincerely doubt that any pump is going to self-prime against a 13 feet feed - you are asking it to shift enough air to create a vacuum to lift the weight of water in the feed pipe - can't see it happening!

MP
Tend to agree, nearly all pumps, (centrifugal & piston) usually have a plugged tee piece to prime the suction pipe.
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Old 14-07-18, 10:54 AM   #8
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Just for interest, self priming centrifugal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FA6t7wHtF0
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