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Old 22-08-12, 06:14 PM   #31
martinpaff
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I quite agree Tony.

We use a very high-grade easy-out, but only where the fastener has sheared leaving the threaded portion "loose". They will never shift a fastener that has been tightened down (to the bottom of a blind hole, for instance) or one that has corroded in.

Rule of Thumb. If it sheared when tightening, try an Easy-Out. If it sheared when undoing, drill it out.

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Old 29-08-12, 12:57 AM   #32
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Drilled a broken head stud out the other week as it had been cross threaded and bottomed out by someone else all 67mm of it and then fitted 2 helicoil inserts together to get the correct thread length. No problems it went down to the correct torque and angles and felt better than the other bolts. I have no problems fitting helicoils as previously stated they are stonger than the original if fitted correctly.
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Old 29-08-12, 09:22 AM   #33
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I have fitted many Helicoils in my time in industry. The sizes we used most were 9/16 & 3/4 unf. These were fitted in crankshafts so i don't doubt they are up to the job. However i have seen quite a few badly fitted (quite easy with large fine theaded ones). I dont use helicoils now for 2 reasons. 1/ I dont like them. 2/they are (due to size specific tooling) bl**** expensive. As for easyouts, there are two types 1/ A L/hand taper thead type,which i consider not as good (are they the cheap ones?) 2/has more of a twisted flute, coarser than the other type. These are the ones i prefer.
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Old 14-12-12, 12:35 AM   #34
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I've recently successfully removed at least 8 broken bolts / studs from a pump (and they were very very well seized in, so much so that I sheared off several in my attempts at undoing them and the rest I had to cut to separate the castings). Firstly I drilled the studs out and tried Easy Outs but this failed until I applied heat, if the part allows then heat the stud or bolt (after drilling out to take the largest Easy Out it will accommodate) to red heat (a quick tickle with a blow lamp will not cut the mustard - it must get very hot !) and quickly tap in the Easy Out and apply pressure - in all cases this worked for me after nothing else would - this just left the hollowed out threaded remains around the Easy Out which was easily removed. The key to this is the heating. Also (as others have said) another way to go is if there is enough bolt or stud left sticking out, weld the thickest washer you can to it and follow up with a nut (be sure to throughly clean the stud or nut to allow the weld to 'take'). The heat soak will provide the heating and the new nut will provide the purchase, if it breaks then try again or file it flat and use the Easy Out technique.

NB: If your using high Cobalt content drills for the first time be warned they are rather brittle !
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Old 14-12-12, 02:25 PM   #35
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on the subject of easy outs i have a set that not the typical type . They are made by blue point (snap on) A set of drills and guides to centre the drill bit in hole . Then a variation of extractors which are like a star shaped bar as look from the end . The points act as teeth , you drill a deep hole and hit them in deeply though . then a guide is sloted down and you take a spanner to it ... NEVER broken one to this day , but with our old projects were into sometimes you might just pass this idea as you go no chance . drill it out and re thread

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Old 15-12-12, 01:11 AM   #36
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I am lucky enough to have the snap on /blue print extractors good bits of kit but not cheap . Another way i have found if the bolt has not been bottomed out is to drill into it centrally and then tap a torx bit into it and gently work it . it has worked for me loads of times but you do need to be sure you dont snap the torx off as they are hard and near impossible to drill out.
Just treat myself to a new flameless inductive heater from snap on . Had a lower ball joint bolt seized in the hub the other day so thought I would give it a go placed the coil wire over the bolt head and hub section gave it a six second blast and you could see the steel smoking with the heat did the same on the back part of the hub pinch bolt and literally undid the bold with relative ease .
I thought this tool was a gimmick till a mate of mine that owns a garage up the road told me he thought the same once he had got one but uses it an a regular basis and raves about it so I got one and think the same .
It really it a good bit of kit for my job and with no flame is a very localised heat around cars with rubber and wires etc.
Trouble is the price tag 650 plus vat
I feel sure it will come in handy for old engine work
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Old 15-12-12, 08:56 AM   #37
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another fan of the blue point stud extractors then

that flmless induction heater does sound alot of money though ... for home use i will just stick with gas

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Old 18-12-12, 12:53 AM   #38
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I agree mate it was a lot of dosh without a doubt and beyond most home workshops budget but with me its handy around bits and bobs on cars as a buisness. With many items on cars that are all flame unfriendly and it can save us time and the customer money . We charge them a very moderate sum for the use of it (enough to cover the cost of replacement ends) but can save the hassle of burning a ball joint gaiter if in that area it then becomes a viable proposition to me .
It has the added advantage being the boss i can use it for my engines if I need some delicate and local heat
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